2018


November 10th & 11th 2018

Springfield, OH

Speakers

Stewart Cheifet

Presentation Summary

Stewart will discuss his early experiences with Radio Shack computers, his time as host of the Computer Chronicles television show, and will give an update on what he's done since the show.

Biography

Stewart Cheifet has been called “the original TV techie” and “the dean of television computer journalists”. He pioneered the field over thirty years ago when he created and launched the award winning public television series “Computer Chronicles”.

He served as host and managing editor of “Computer Chronicles”. He also anchored another public television series devoted to the people, culture and business of the Internet, called “Net Café”. Both series were broadcast nationally and throughout the world in over 100 countries for twenty years. His work has been translated into Spanish, French and Arabic versions. His programs are still popular online and are regularly downloaded and viewed by fans all around the world.

Stewart has been a guest commentator on technology for National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered” and he hosted a weekly web-radio talk show called “Talking about this Week”, produced by About.com in association with Broadcast.com. He also wrote and anchored a syndicated radio series about the Internet, “CyberTraffic Report”.

He has been a commentator, anchor, and emcee at many major technology events including Comdex TV News, the Computer Museum’s Computer Bowl, Discover Magazine’s Technology Awards, Upside’s Showcase, Upside’s Digital Living Room, Windows Magazine’s Win-100 Awards, and the Codie Awards for the Software Publishers Association and the Software Information Industry Association.

He frequently appears as a moderator and speaker at corporate events in the technology field, having worked with such companies as Acer, AutoDesk, Bay Networks, Boeing, Cable & Wireless, Commerce One, Hewlett Packard, IBM, KPMG, NetSuite, Oracle, PeopleSoft, Sybase, and others.

He is a graduate of the University of Southern California with a degree in mathematics and psychology. He also holds a doctorate in law from Harvard University and he was a Benton Fellow in technology journalism at the University of Chicago. He also serves on the faculty of the Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada.

http://cheifet.com

Stewart Cheifet

Host of "Computer Chronicles"

Mike Yetsko

Presentation Summary

Mike will discuss his experiences working for Tandy Radio Shack first as a store manager and then as an engineer in Ft. Worth. This presentation will take place Saturday night so it will be interactive, casual and you'll be able to ask lots of questions!

Biography

"Started with Radio Shack 'officially' in 1976 as part time sales. Unofficially on the bench for months before that. Quickly became one of the top sales persons for the district.

Given my own store in the spring of 1977. The TRS-80 ruined me for retail. Made a battery powered TRS-80.

Back to part time sale by spring of 1978. Fall of 1978 was on Long Island at a computer repair bench. To the regional office in PA by Febuary as a 'Regional Technical Rep' for Radio Shack Computers.

In the summer of 1980 was moved to Tech support in Fort Worth. Mainly as an instructor, but also as the 'offical rep' for the Model II computer and secondary for printers. Did a short stint in Internation Franchise supporting computer products, then back to Tech Support as manager of the diagnostic group. Finally ended up in Tandy RnD and stayed there until I resigned and moved on in September of 1985

After Tandy I did a couple years at a small group out of Harvard called the Center for Clinical Computing under Dr Howard Bleich. Then moved on to a small startup which folded and to Racal-Interlan. After a couple years went to a small startup named SystemSoft. At SystemSoft I was on the cutting edge of laptops with power management, performance, and flexibility. Most laptops in that era had code in them that I wrote, such as Compaq, Toshiba, DEC, HP, IBM and others. Did the first 'hot swapable' hard disk system, and was instrumental in the emerging FLASH technology.

Did software for drag racing for a number of years, and was selling weather software that would predict engine and vehicle performance.

Now a semi-retired ski instructor..."

Mike Yetsko

Tandy Radio Shack Engineer

Thomas McLaren

Learn facts, hear the hypothesis, and get hands-on experience of the little kludge of a portable that touched so few lives, Radio Shack’s Tandy 600. Presented by Thomas McLaren of DigitalDinos, the guy who wrote the latest, and probably last ever, Tandy 600 FAQ. If you've got Tandy 600 questions, the Tandy 600 FAQ Live might have answers!

Thomas McLaren

"The Tandy 600 FAQ Live"

Arthur A. Gleckler

Presentation Summary

As a teenager, I wrote the game Weerd on my cassette-only TRS-80 Model I, then had the great fortune of selling it through Big Five Software. I'll cover the technical, economic, legal, and emotional challenges of that journey, and the highs and lows of being a kid publishing software in the early 1980s. I'm betting that many people at Tandy Assembly will recognize parts of this story in their own experiences.

Biography

At thirteen, after a year of writing programs on paper and mowing grass and shoveling snow to make money, I bought a TRS-80 Model I, Level I BASIC TRS-80. I haven't been able to stop programming since.

Arthur A. Gleckler

"One Kid's Weerd Journey into Software"

Jim McGinley

Presentation Summary

Watch the best TRS-80 Model I/III action games played at their highest, most intense best. Videos of Jim playing 20 games will be shown including Defense Command, Armored Patrol, Clash, Time Bandit, Robot Attack, Convoy, Panic. While you're likely aware of these games, you've never seen them dialed to 11. Presentation will finish with a live play of Outhouse at Level 18. Jim is practicing now...

Biography

Jim McGinley is perhaps the greatest player of TRS-80 action games alive today. For reasons he doesn't understand, his mad keyboard clacking skills are sharper than ever. Jim's only goal in life, perhaps self serving, is to ensure these games aren't forgotten. Two TRS-80 Game Developer Conference presentations have prepared him for the big show... the Tandy Assembly.

Jim McGinley

"TRS-80 Games"

Arno Puder & Sascha Haeberling

The RetroStoreCard is an extension card that connects to the TRS-80 I/O bus. It provides access to RetroStore which is a cloud-based backend service allowing it to download and run vintage programs. The complete source code as well as the hardware schematics of the RetroStoreCard are released under a permissive open source license. In this presentation we document the journey from understanding the TRS-80 I/O bus, to a breadboard-based prototype to designing the PCB as well as the accompanying software. We hope to inspire others to design and build their own extension card.

Arno Puder & Sascha Haeberling

"Building an Extension Card for the TRS-80: Lessons learned from the RetroStoreCard"






Guidelines for Tandy Assembly Speakers and Presentations


  1. If we need to reach out to you about schedule changes, the topic of your presentation, etc, its important that you respond to us in a timely manner.
  2. Tandy Assembly is a family friendly conference. Some people bring their children to the event. Keep this in mind when putting together your presentation and refrain from inappropriate language and content.
  3. We use YouTube to live stream and record Tandy Assembly presentations. Please do not include music that exceeds “fair use” standards or may otherwise be flagged for copyright violations.
  4. Always be supportive of the other speakers. We're all friends, be supportive and don't speak negatively about other speakers at the event.
  5. We each have our own religious and political beliefs, but a Tandy Assembly presentation is not an appropriate place to express these. Please refrain from political and religious content in your presentation.
  6. Presentations should be relevant to Tandy / Radio Shack computers. This does not mean that your presentation must be technical, but you should always keep Tandy/Radio Shack computers in the context of your presentation.
  7. Please stick to the time allotted to you for your presentation and allow time for Q&A. If there are more questions when your time is up, you can handle these one on one outside the speaking area. Please respect other's by staying within your allotted time.